Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Isaiah 6

I've been thinking about Isaiah 6 today. It's one of the pivotal detailed worship experiences recorded in the Bible. Read for yourself:

In the year that King Uzziah died, I saw the Lord seated on a throne, high and exalted, and the train of his robe filled the temple. Above him were seraphs, each with six wings: With two wings they covered their faces, with two they covered their feet, and with two they were flying. And they were calling to one another: "Holy, holy, holy is the LORD Almighty; the whole earth is full of his glory."

At the sound of their voices the doorposts and thresholds shook and the temple was filled with smoke.

"Woe to me!" I cried. "I am ruined! For I am a man of unclean lips, and I live among a people of unclean lips, and my eyes have seen the King, the LORD Almighty."

Then one of the seraphs flew to me with a live coal in his hand, which he had taken with tongs from the altar. With it he touched my mouth and said, "See, this has touched your lips; your guilt is taken away and your sin atoned for."

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, "Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?" And I said, "Here am I. Send me!"


Yes, worship is a lifestyle. It's something we live out day to day. But there are also clearly defined moments of worship in our lives. Sundays, for instance. In these moments, God reveals Himself to us, and we as His children naturally respond. We shouldn't have to "drum up" a response. Our act of worship should never be contrived or strained.

I think that the major reason that our Sunday experiences often don't mirror Isaiah's is because we fail to see the Lord. Isaiah "saw the Lord seated on a throne, high and exalted." Everything else just flowed from there. He was overwhelmed with a sense of God's splendor and majesty. He couldn't help but humble himself in worship of the Almighty.

This Sunday, try reading Isaiah 6 when you first wake up and then meditate on the power of God leading up to worship. See if that doesn't jump start an authentic encounter with God in worship.

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